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Listed buildings

Posted by admin
January 28th, 2016

Listed buildings

I thought I would write a post about listed buildings as I am about to start working on one. Owning a listed building is slightly different than owning a non listed building in as much as what you can and can not do.

If you have a building that is listed it will be on the Statutory List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest, being listed doesn’t only apply to property but also parks, wreck sites and monuments etc.

Screenshot of Historic England website

Grades of listed buildings

There are three grades of listings I, II* and II.

  • Grade I: These are buildings of exceptional special interest. There is only a small number of listings with this status.
  • Grade II*: These are high quality buildings and on the most part are unaltered, and often with an interior of special interest.
  • Grade II: This is the biggest group consisting of around 95% of buildings.

So if you own a listed building it is more likely to be a Grade II listed.

Working on a listed building

When working on a listed building it is best to check with your local council what you can and can not do to your property, don’t just go ahead with works think it will be ok as it could be costly and you may have to redo the works in line the the local Planning Department. Listed buildings can not be modified without first obtaining listed building consent through the relevant local planning authority.

When working on any listed building any alterations or decoration should be undertaken sympathetically to its original state and or surrounding area.

You should always stick to the guidelines and to what has been agreed with the local council, if not you may be required to change what has been done at your cost.

Local authorities can if required serve a repair notice if they fell the property isn’t being preserved well enough and maintaining it well. If one of these notices are served, it will explain what is required to be done and a timeframe to complete works. If this notice isn’t complied with the local authority could submit a compulsory purchase order to the Secretary of State.

Owning a listed building

If you own a listed building you should do some research about the property, contact the local council planning department and find out as much about your property as you can, find out what you can and can not do without permission. You can find out some information about the listed building on the Historic England website.

When making alterations or simply routine upkeep of your property you may have to employ specialists, such as a thatcher for you roof. You may have to source materials that were used originally on your property, such as slate, or you may need to use lime render rather than standard render.

All of these things need to be thought about and budgeted for when buying and maintaining a listed property.

The important thing to remember is if you are unsure, seek advice. It is always better to be safer than sorry.

Some useful links

Below are some useful links you may find of interest and helpful.

17th century house

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Recent listed building exterior job summer 2014

Posted by admin
September 15th, 2014

Grade II listed building

Recent listed building exterior job summer 2014

As the summer draws to a close I thought I would post about a recent job I have completed. The job was a 17th century Grade II listed building property in my local area. I viewed the property in mid April 2014 with the intent to do the job late summer.

The property required some repair work to woodwork but was also in need of two new windows, a box sash window on the front elevation and a small window to the side elevation. These windows were made by a local joinery company and fitted by a local builder.

The building is timber framed that originally had weatherboard on the exterior but was rendered some year ago. The roof has a catslide style, this means one side is longer than the other.

Decorating the exterior

The rendered walls had algae growing on them so the first job was to treat this with a algae and anti fungicide wash, this was applied, left for a while, and then thoroughly washed and scrubbed off.

Once the walls were dry I could apply the masonry paint, two coats were applied to the walls of a Dulux smooth masonry paint in Magnolia. Once this was done it was time to do the windows.

There were nine windows in all to paint, the frames were painted in Sadolin Superdec Walnut, and the windows themselves in Sadolin Superdec Magnolia, the front door was also painted in the same Walnut and magnolia.

The guttering and downpipes were painted in a black gloss, the plinth was painted in a black bitumen to finish off the bottom of the property.

The customers were very happy and as you can see by the pictures below, there is a big difference between the before and after shots.

The before and after pictures

Grade II listed building side elevation

Grade II listed building frontelevation

Grade II listed building render


Grade II listed building side elevation

Grade II listed building side elevation

Grade II listed building side elevation


Grade II listed building side elevation

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